© 2017 ICCLAP

Legal Education Review - Special Topic - Indigenous Cultural Competency

Over the past twelve months the ICCLAP Project Team has been working with the Legal Education Review to produce a special topic issue on Indigenous cultural competency in legal education and practice. This special edition includes a rich and diverse range of scholarly articles on issues relating to the embedding of ICC in law. Thematically these articles outline the ICCLAP research process and outcomes; and reflections on changes in law schools and practice since 2005. The need for ICC is elaborated with a focus on Indigenous student experiences and a framework for ICC in an Aboriginal community controlled legal service. They also explore conceptual approaches to developing ICC in curricula; and practical examples of how ICC has been incorporated into law programs in different ways. The collection concludes with a call for reform to legal professional accreditation standards to include ICC to ensure that lawyers can meet their ethical and professional responsibilities to Indigenous peoples.

Together these contributions present a range of perspectives and approaches to embedding ICC in law, and in many ways highlight the complexity and challenges of engaging in this work. As a growing number of legal educators and practitioners take up this challenge, we move towards a more just and equitable society which values Indigenous peoples, cultures and laws, as an essential part of the legal landscape in Australia. The contributions to this special edition demonstrate what can be achieved with a little imagination, creativity and a commitment to bridge the existing gaps in legal education and practice. The ICCLAP Project Team would like to thank all the contributors to this special edition, which we hope will inspire more lawyers and legal academics to take up this challenging and rewarding work.

The special edition is available at Legal Education Review - Special Edition - ICC in Law.


Acknowledgement of Country

We acknowledge the traditional owners and custodians of country throughout Australia, and their continuing connection to land and waters. We pay our respects to elders, past, present and emerging. We acknowledge that these have always been places of knowledge, teaching and learning.

Contact

School of Law, University of New England
ARMIDALE NSW 2351

Marcelle Burns, Project Leader (02) 6773-2686

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Funding Acknowledgement

Support for this project has been provided by the Australian Government Department for Education and Training. The views expressed by this project do not necessarily reflect the views of the Australian Government Department for Education and Training.